300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid a history of asteroid collision near misses Yard 300 Asteroid Near Miss

300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid a history of asteroid collision near misses Yard 300 Asteroid Near Miss
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300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid

300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid Did You Know An Asteroid Almost Hit Earth Yesterday Yard Miss 300 Asteroid Near, 300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid Asteroid Dubbed Quotcity Killerquot Narrowly Misses Our Planet Yard Miss Asteroid Near 300, 300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid Whew That Was Close Asteroid Nearly Hits Earth Miss Asteroid Yard Near 300, 300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid After Another Near Miss Stanford Professor Wants To Find 300 Near Yard Asteroid Miss, 300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid Nasa Says Skull Shaped Asteroid Will Fly Near Earth On 300 Near Yard Miss Asteroid, 300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid Fun Holiday Near Miss Day Yard Miss 300 Near Asteroid, 300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid Asteroid To Whiz By Earth At Closest Distance In Centuries 300 Miss Yard Near Asteroid, 300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid City Killer Asteroid Will Pass Close To Earth On February 300 Yard Near Asteroid Miss, 300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid March 23 Near Miss Day Hurrah We Didn39t Get Wiped Out Miss 300 Near Yard Asteroid, 300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid Asteroid The Size Of The Great Pyramid Of Giza To Shoot Near Yard 300 Asteroid Miss, 300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid Easter Sunday Asteroid On Collision Course With Earth Near Yard Miss 300 Asteroid, 300 Yard Near Miss Asteroid Asteroid Path 2019 Biggest Asteroids And Near Misses To Asteroid Miss Yard 300 Near.



Interesting thoughts!

The Ocean Worlds Of Our Solar System. There are more than 100 moons in our Solar System that do their mysterious gravitational dance around the eight major planets belonging to our Sun's family. Most of them are icy and small, containing only tiny quantities of rocky material, and they circle around the quartet of giant gaseous planets that dwell in the outer regions of our Solar System. The four majestic, giant denizens of the outer limits--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune--are cloaked in blankets of gas, and they are orbited by sparkling, icy moons and moonlets. Of the quartet of relatively small, rocky terrestrial planets--Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars--Mercury and Venus are moonless, and Mars is circled by a pathetic duo of tiny and somewhat deformed moons (Phobos and Deimos). The two little moons of Mars are interesting objects, frequently considered to be asteroids that escaped from the Main Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter, only to be snared by the Red Planet's gravitational pull when our Solar System was young. Earth's own beautiful, beguiling, bewitching Moon is the only large one inhabiting the inner kingdom of our Solar System.



There was a time when Earth had no Moon. About 4.5 billion years ago, when our ancient Solar System was still forming, the dark night sky above our primordial planet was moonless. At this time, the Earth was about 60 percent formed, although it did have a differentiated crust, mantle, and core. This was a very chaotic and violent era in our Solar System's past, with planets first forming out of blobs of primordial dust, gas, and rock. During this era, frequently likened to a "cosmic shooting gallery", collisions between the still-forming planets were commonplace. Orbits were not as orderly as they are now.



A moon is a natural body that is in orbit around a planet, and it is kept in place by both the host planet's gravity and the gravity of the moon itself. Some planets possess orbiting moons; some do not. There are several theories explaining how Earth's Moon came to be. At this point, the favored model is termed the giant impact theory, often playfully called the Big Whack or Big Splash theory by astronomers when they are in a humorous frame of mind. These funny nicknames were derived from the central tenet of the theory, which is that a Mars-sized body, named Theia, smacked into the primordial Earth billions of years ago. The collision caused part of our planet's crust to be hurled violently into space. Some of this shattered, somersaulting debris was snared into Earth-orbit, where it formed a host of moonlets that were ultimately pulled together by gravity to evolve into our Moon.

If you want to measure our solar system, how would you do it? This simplest way is to measure it in light years. For those not familiar with the term, a light-year is the distance that light travels in a vacuum in one year. This is because the distances between stars is so huge that it is otherwise very challenging to imagine them. A light year is exactly 9,460,730,472,580.8 kilometers. Putting this into real world distances, the Milky Way is approximately 100,000 light-years across.



The clear indications that Enceladus possesses liquid water, and perhaps life, catapulted the tiny moon into the same mighty league as its sister moons, Europa of Jupiter and Titan of Saturn, as a world that could potentially harbor precious living tidbits.



The most widely accepted scenario, explaining our Moon's mysterious and ancient birth, is termed the Giant Impact Theory. According to this theory, Earth's Moon was born as the result of a gigantic collision between our still-forming planet and a primordial Mars-sized protoplanet that has been named Theia. The tragedy that was the doomed Theia probably had an orbit that crossed Earth's--making such a catastrophic collision difficult to avoid. It is thought that the impacting Theia hit our planet hard, but swiped it with a glancing blow at precisely the right angle. In fact, Theia came very close to bouncing off Earth, but was swallowed instead. The blast dispatched shock waves across our ancient planet, hurling debris and gas screaming into space. For a short time, Earth had a ring around it that was composed of this ejected material.

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