Astronomy Now 2019 cassinis last look at titan reveals more surprises Now 2019 Astronomy

Astronomy Now 2019 cassinis last look at titan reveals more surprises Now 2019 Astronomy
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Astronomy Now 2019

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"This is the closest we've come, so far, to identifying a place with some of the ingredients needed for a habitable environment. These results demonstrate the interconnected nature of NASA's science missions that are getting us closer to answering whether we are indeed alone or not," commented Dr. Thomas Zurbuchen in an April 13, 2017 NASA Press Release. Dr. Zurbuchen is associate administrator for NASA's Science Mission Directorate at Headquarters in Washington D.C.



Until 2004, no spacecraft had visited Saturn for more than twenty years. Pioneer 11 took the very first close-up images of Saturn when it flew past in 1979. After that flyby, Voyager 1 had its rendezvous about a year later, and in August 1981 Voyager 2 had its brief, but glorious, encounter. Nearly a quarter of a century then passed before new high-resolution images of this beautiful, ringed planet were beamed back to Earth.



Earlier theories suggested that the craggy outline of a region of the lunar surface, named Oceanus Procellarum--or the Ocean of Storms--had resulted from a large asteroid impact. If this theory had been correct, the basin it had dug out would represent the largest asteroid impact basin scarring the lunar surface. However, mission scientists, scrutinizing GRAIL data, now believe that they have discovered new evidence that the craggy outline of this rectangular region--approximately 1,600 miles across--was actually caused by the formation of ancient rift valleys.

It seems to me that many people will have you believe that the moon and fishing are complicated. This perplexes me, because the subjects don't have to be. As I've said you can learn what you need to know in about a half an hour by getting a FREE e-book such as this. Many times the people making these subjects seem so confusing are simply trying to sell you something.



What is a New Moon? The moon goes through different phases, in fact there are eight different phases all told with the new moon being the first phase (No, there is no 'old' moon phase). When the sun and the moon have an equal ecliptic longitude it appears that the moon just 'disappears'. This is because during the new moon phase the moon is on the same side of the Earth as the Sun, causing the dark side of the moon to face our planet. More accurately, during the new moon phase it's hidden behind the sun from sunrise to sunset giving us the impression that it has disappeared.



Ganymede is the largest moon in our Solar System. Indeed, its impressive diameter of nearly 3,280 miles makes it almost as big as Mars! Astronomers have known since the 1990s that this frigidly cold moon, that circles around the gas-giant planet Jupiter, contains a hidden salty subsurface ocean of liquid water, sloshing around deep beneath its secretive shell of ice. However, in May 2014, planetary scientists announced that the situation may be somewhat more complicated--Ganymede's ocean might be organized like a multi-tiered sandwich, with ice and oceans stacked up in several layers, according to new NASA-funded research that models this enormous moon's composition.

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