Dutch Mission to Mars

George Edmundson wrote, in Encyclopædia Britannica, 1911 edition, that the bishops, in fact, as the result of grants of immunities by a succession of German kings, and notably by the Saxon and Franconian emperors, gradually became the temporal rulers of a dominion as great as the neighboring counties and duchies. John Mason Neale explained, in History of the so-called Jansenist church of Holland, that bishops “became warriors rather than prelates; the duties of their pastoral office were frequently exercised by suffragans, while they themselves headed armies against the Dukes of Guelders or the Counts of Holland. ” (p63)Adalbold II of Utrecht “must be regarded as the principal founder of the territorial possessions of the diocese,” according to Albert Hauck, in New Schaff–Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge, especially by the acquisition in 1024 and 1026 of the counties of Drenthe and Teisterbant;
but, the name “Bishopric of Utrecht” is not used in the article.
Debitum pastoralis officii nobis was Pope Leo X’s 1517 prohibition to the Archbishop-Elector of Cologne, Hermann of Wied, as legatus natus,[a] to summon, to a court of first instance in Cologne, Philip of Burgundy, his treasurer, and his ecclesiastical and secular subjects. [b]
Leo X only confirmed a right of the Church, explained Neale; but Leo X’s confirmation “was providential” in respect to the future schism. (p72)
The Bishopric ended when Henry of the Palatinate resigned the see in 1528 with the consent of the cathedral chapter, and transferred his secular authority to Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor. The chapters voluntarily transferred their right of electing the bishop to Charles V, and Pope Clement VII gave his consent to the proceeding. George Edmundson wrote, in History of Holland, that Henry, “was compelled” in 1528 to formally surrender “the temporalities of the see” to Charles V. (p21)Lordship of Utrecht

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