Moon Rocks From Apollo 11 moon rock wikipedia Apollo Moon From 11 Rocks

Moon Rocks From Apollo 11 moon rock wikipedia Apollo Moon From 11 Rocks
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Moon Rocks From Apollo 11

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The Kuiper Belt. Dark, distant, and cold, the Kuiper Belt is the remote domain of an icy multitude of comet nuclei, that orbit our Sun in a strange, fantastic, and fabulous dance. Here, in the alien deep freeze of our Solar System's outer suburbs, the ice dwarf planet Pluto and its quintet of moons dwell along with a cornucopia of others of their bizarre and frozen kind. This very distant region of our Star's domain is so far from our planet that astronomers are only now first beginning to explore it, thanks to the historic visit to the Pluto system by NASA's very successful and productive New Horizons spacecraft on July 14, 2015. New Horizons is now well on its way to discover more and more long-held secrets belonging to this distant, dimly lit domain of icy worldlets.



Other than the sun, no other celestial body significantly affects the earth as the moon does. It is well know that the moon affects the rise and fall of the ocean tide. Such is the effect of the gravitational pull between the earth and the moon. Jupiter is easily the largest planet in our solar system. To put its size in context, Jupiter is more than 300 times the mass of Earth. Here is the interesting part; Jupiter has 63 moons that orbit it and yet it is not the planet in the Solar System with the most moons. That honor belongs to the ringed-planet Saturn, which has 66 moons identified so far. Pluto, the farthest flung among the nine planets, has been the subject of heated debate on whether it really qualifies to be considered a planet. Nowadays, it is classified as a dwarf planet. Its orbit around the Sun is somewhat heavily elliptical. In fact, there are instances where Pluto is actually closer to the Sun than Neptune, the planet that precedes it.



GRAIL Mission Puts A New Face On The Moon! Scientific investigation into the origin of lunar impact basins has been hampered because there is a general lack of agreement on their size. The majority of the largest impact basins pock-mark the near-side of the Moon (the Moon's enchanting "face"), and have also been filled in by gushing lava streams. These lava streams have covered up, and rendered invisible, important clues pertaining to the shape of the land.

"There's an assumption we do have to make, which is that there's no changes in the material itself, and that all of the bumps we're seeing (in the gravity field) are from changes in the porosity and the amount of air between the rocks," Dr. Soderblom continued to explain in the September 10, 2015 MIT Press Release.



The fact that Enceladus becomes so extremely distorted suggests that it contains quite a bit of water. A watery moon would, of course, be a flexible one. Therefore, for Enceladus to be as flexible as it apparently is, it must hold either an enormous local ocean or one that is global. Parts of that immense ocean may be pleasantly warm--but other portions might be quite hot.



The hydrothermal vents on Earth's seafloor shoot out mineral-laden, hot fluid. This sustains some very unusual and unique forms of life--such as the wavy, wormish tubeworms--and other creatures that are able to thrive in this strange environment. Microbes can convert mineral-laden fluid into metabolic energy, making these ecosystems possible--both on Earth's seafloor and elsewhere.

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