NASA Extrasolar Planets Found the stochastic scientist new variation on transit time Found Planets Extrasolar NASA

NASA Extrasolar Planets Found the stochastic scientist new variation on transit time Found Planets Extrasolar NASA
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NASA Extrasolar Planets Found

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Interesting thoughts!

So here you have two definitions of a blue moon but the one for a calendar blue moon does not describe the true meaning of a blue moon. Here's why:



Using computer models, the team of scientists came up with a complex interior structure for Ganymede, composed of an ocean sandwiched between up to three layers of ice--in addition to the very important rocky seafloor. The lightest ice, of course, would be on top, and the saltiest liquid would be heavy enough to sink to the bottom. Furthermore, the results suggest the existence of a truly weird phenomenon that would cause the oceans to "snow" upwards! This bizarre "snow" might develop because, as the oceans swirl and churn, and frigid plumes wind and whirl around, ice in the uppermost ocean layer, called Ice III, may form in the seawater. When ice forms, salts precipitate out. The heavier salts would then tumble down, and the lighter ice, or "snow," would flutter upward. The "snow" would them melt again before reaching the top of the ocean--and this would possibly leave slush lurking in the middle of the moon's odd sandwich!



GRAIL Mission Puts A New Face On The Moon! Scientific investigation into the origin of lunar impact basins has been hampered because there is a general lack of agreement on their size. The majority of the largest impact basins pock-mark the near-side of the Moon (the Moon's enchanting "face"), and have also been filled in by gushing lava streams. These lava streams have covered up, and rendered invisible, important clues pertaining to the shape of the land.

The Kuiper Belt is situated beyond the orbit of the beautiful, blue, and banded giant gaseous planet, Neptune--the outermost of the eight major planets of our Sun's family. Pluto is a relatively large inhabitant of this region, and it was--initially--classified as the ninth major planet from our Sun after its discovery by the American astronomer Clyde Tombaugh (1906-1997) in 1930. However, the eventual realization among astronomers that the frozen little "oddball" that is Pluto, is really only one of numerous other icy bodies inhabiting the Kuiper Belt, forced the IAU to formally define the term "planet" in 2006--and poor, pitiful Pluto lost its lofty designation of "major planet" only to be re-classified as a mere minor one--a demoted dwarf planet.



Most of the moons of our Solar System are intriguing, frigid, and dimly lit ice-worlds in orbit around the quartet of outer, majestic, gaseous giant planets that circle our Star, the Sun, from a great distance. In our quest for the Holy Grail of discovering life beyond our Earth, some of these icy moons are considered to be the most likely worlds, within our own Solar System, to host life. This is because they are thought to hide oceans of life-sustaining liquid water beneath their alien shells of ice--and life as we know it requires liquid water to emerge, evolve, and flourish. In April 2017, a team of planetary scientists announced that they have discovered the presence of hydrogen gas in a plume of material erupting from Enceladus, a mid-sized moon of the ringed, gas-giant planet Saturn, indicating that microbes may exist within the global ocean swirling beneath the cracked icy shell of this distant small world. Currently, two veteran NASA missions are providing new and intriguing details about the icy, ocean-bearing moons of the gas-giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, further heightening scientific fascination with these and other "ocean worlds" in our Solar System--and beyond.



Indeed, the mixture of nitrogen and methane that whirl around in Titan's swirling thick golden-orange atmosphere create a variety of organic compounds. It has been suggested that the heaviest materials float down to the surface of this hydrocarbon-slashed moon. When these organic compounds tumble down into Titan's lakes and seas--either by raining down from the clouds in alien showers of hydrocarbons, or by traveling along with Titan's strange rivers--some are dissolved in the liquid methane. The compounds that manage to survive this ordeal, and do not dissolve (such as nitrites and benzene), float down to the alien sea floors of this oddball moon-world.

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